Rules & Regulations for solid waste in the Marine

Rules & Regulations for solid waste in the Marine and Offshore Industries

The global maritime industry has never faced more environmental challenges than today.  The same industry is under constant pressure in order to comply with the increasingly strict set of rules and regulations with regards to the environment.

Owners, operators, charterers and other players in the maritime industry have, in addition, implemented s higher environmental demands with a common goal to become cleaner and greener.

During the latest years lots of things have happened with reference to marine waste management, but the most significant change is undoubtedly the revised IMO Marpol 73/78 Annex V.

Marpol 73/78 Annex V

The revised IMO Marpol 73/78 Annex V will enter into force on the 1st of January 2013 and includes a number of operational consequences. Ship generated waste materials that previously was disposed of at sea, such as paper & cardboard, glass, metal tins & cans (all ground or un‐ground), but also materials that float such as lining and packing materials etc. will have to be kept onboard for subsequent recycling or disposal ashore. In this respect ships will be forced to either find additional storage space for the waste, or required to reduce the volume for onboard storage if available space is limited.

 

Marpol 73/78 Annex V

 

The revised IMO Marpol 73/78 Annex V will enter into force on the 1st of January 2013 and includes a number of operational consequences. Ship generated waste materials that previously was disposed of at sea, such as paper & cardboard, glass, metal tins & cans (all ground or un‐ground), but also materials that float such as lining and packing materials etc. will have to be kept onboard for subsequent recycling or disposal ashore. In this respect ships will be forced to either find additional storage space for the waste, or required to reduce the volume for onboard storage if available space is limited.

 

Marpol defines several certain sea areas as “special areas”, where special waste handling methods must be implemented:

Rules and regulations

Simplified overview of the discharge requirements of the revised MARPOL Annex

Rules and regulations

Please refer to the original text of MARPOL Annex V or the 2012 Guidelines for the Implementation of MARPOL Annex V for a detailed and complete overview concerning the respective discharge requirements.

www.imo.org/ourwork/environment/pollutionprevention/garbage/Pages/Default.aspx

 

DNV Newsletter

Ocober 19. 2012 – The newsletter lists the main changes in the revised MARPOL Annex V, adopted on 15 July 2011 in resolution MEPC.201(62), which will enter into force on 1 January 2013.

rulls-and-regulations

This newsletter lists the main changes in the revised MARPOL Annex V, adopted on 15 July 2011 in resolution MEPC.201(62), which will enter into force on 1 January 2013.

 

The main changes in the revised MARPOL Annex V are as follows:

 

  • Practically all discharges of waste into the sea are prohibited, including cooking oil and all plastics, even in the form of incinerator ash.
  • The only discharges allowed are:

    Outside special areas:

 

  • >3nm from the nearest land for comminuted/ground food waste (able to pass through a screen with openings no greater than 25mm)
  • >12nm from the nearest land for food waste and cargo residues that are not harmful to the marine environment
  • Cleaning agents which are not harmful to the marine environment (contained in cargo hold, deck and external surfaces wash water)
  • Animal carcasses (as far as possible from the nearest land and in accordance with IMO guidelines).

 

Inside special areas:

 

  • >12nm from the nearest land for comminuted/ground food waste (able to pass through a screen with openings no greater than 25mm)
  • >12nm for cargo residues that are not harmful to the marine environment (only if the ship is not transiting outside the special area between ports and no adequate reception facilities are available at those ports)
  • Cleaning agents which are not harmful to the marine environment (contained in deck and external surfaces wash water).

 

 

 

  • An “en route” clause has been introduced, meaning that most allowable discharges are only permitted while the ship is en route.
  • A Revised Garbage Record Book (new categories and different recording requirements).
  • Every vessel of 100 GT and above or carrying 15 persons or more shall carry a Garbage Management Plan.
  • Ships 12 metres in length or more and fixed or floating platforms are to display placards notifying crew and passengers of the MARPOL Annex V requirements.
  • Discharges of any garbage from fixed or floating platforms and from any ship alongside or within 500m of a fixed or floating platform are prohibited.

 

Further extensive guidance on the revised MARPOL Annex V can be found in the 2012 Guidelines for the Implementation of Annex V (MEPC.219(63) adopted on 2 March 2012).

 

Shipowners are reminded that the revised Annex V entails that:

 

  • Crews should be instructed on the forthcoming requirements.
  • A revised Garbage Management Plan must be produced and implemented on board.
  • Placards on board must be renewed so as to display the revised garbage disposal requirements.
  • The Garbage Record Book must be updated in accordance with the new recording requirements.

 


DNV introduces a new Statement of Compliance

In light of the new requirements coming into force, DNV is introducing a new Statement of Compliance with respect to Annex V (Garbage Pollution Prevention).
The Statement of Compliance confirms that the equipment on board the ship is in accordance with the new revised Annex V (e.g. Garbage Management Plan, placards, Garbage Record Book, containers, processing equipment, etc). It is to be issued after a successful initial survey and will be renewed on every renewal survey (subject to the five-yearly survey scheme). Since Annex V does not prescribe any sort of certification, the aforementioned Statement of Compliance can help owners demonstrate compliance to any interested party, such as port state control or harbour authorities, etc.

 

Date: 2012-10-19

National Requirements

Even though the revised Marpol 73/78, Annex V covers most environmentally related issues for the global maritime industry, there are still some National Requirements that go even further. 

 

National Requirements

 

Even though the revised Marpol 73/78, Annex V covers most environmentally related issues for the global maritime industry, there are still some National Requirements that go even further. 

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION!

The following requirements may change any time and should therefore not be considered as complete. We advise you to contact your respective Flag State for precise information.

Norwegian

In Norwegian waters, the regulators are the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) and the Petroleum Safety Authority (PSA). Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • Regulations Relating To Design And Outfitting Of Facilities Etc. In The Petroleum Activities (The Facilities Regulations) Chapter IV-I, Sections 48 – 55 and Guidelines thereto. This references

NORSOK D-001, D-002 and D-010, with additional requirements to D-001;

  • Regulations Relating To Conduct Of Activities In The Petroleum Activities (The Activities Regulations) Section 9 and Guidelines thereto – Chapter 4 / Sect. 30a and Chapter 7 /Section 46;

Denmark

In Danish waters, the regulator is the Danish Energy Agency. Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • Offshore Safety Act No. 1424 of December 21, 2005 with subsequent amendments;
  • Executive Order No. 729 of 3rd July 2009;
  • Guidelines for the Design of Fixed Offshore Installations 2009;
  • Guidelines for Drilling – Exploration 1988 (2009), attachment to “A Guide to Hydrocarbon Licenses in Denmark”.

The approach requires a Safety Case to ALARP and the use of recognised standards.

UK

In UK waters, the regulator is the Health & Safety Executive (HSE). Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • SI 1996/913 The Offshore Installations and Wells (Design and Construction, etc.) Regulations 1996 (DCR).

The approach uses a Safety Case to ALARP. The Duty Holder must show that the Performance Standards are suitable and sufficient, which is done through the application of industry standards or alternatively more detailed assessment, to show that the residual risk not removed by the safety system is as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP). Wells are covered by a separate Well Examination Scheme under DCR requiring examinations by independent and competent persons.

US

In US waters, the regulator under the Department of Interior (DOI) is the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE). The BOEMRE has two separate functional bureaus:

  • Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will be responsible for managing development of the nation’s offshore resources;
  • Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) for enforcing safety and environmental regulations.

Key regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • 30 CFR Part 250 – Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf;
  • NTL No. 2010-N10 US Department of the Interior BOEMRE, National Notice to Lessees and Operators of Federal Oil and Gas Leases, Outer Continental Shelf, “Statement of Compliance with Applicable Regulations and Evaluation of Information Demonstrating Adequate Spill Response and Well Containment Resources”, November 08, 2010;
  • NTL No. 2009-G07, US Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, National Notice to Lessees and Operators of Federal Oil and Gas Leases, Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, “Location of Choke and Kill Lines on Blowout Preventer Stacks”, May 1, 2009.

The regulations require adherence to a number of API RP’s and Specs.

Brazil

In Brazilian waters, the regulators are Agência Nacional do Petróleo, Gás Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP). Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • Resolution No. 43;
  • Technical resolution Safety Management System

(SGSO);

  •  CONAMA Resolution No. 23: Licensing of drilling and production activities.

The approach is goal-setting, with reliance on industry standards and the requirement for risk analysis.

Canada

In Canadian waters, the regulators are the National Energy Board, the Canada Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board and the Canada Newfoundland & Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board. Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (COGOA);
  • SOR/2009-315 Canada Oil & Gas Drilling and Production Regulations;
  • Draft Safety Plan Guidelines;
  • Draft Drilling and Production Guidelines.

Section 36.1 of the Safety Plan Guidelines lists Industry Standards and Practices that may be used; these are mostly API, together with NACE Standard MR0175.92m Item No. 53024 & NORSOK 010; The majority of the Drilling and Production Regulations are written in a goal- or performance-based style with clear regulatory objectives or goals. Goal oriented regulation is a hybrid approach that includes prescriptive and goal- or performance-based elements. The prescriptive elements are retained in the management system elements, information requirements for reporting and in information requirements related to applications for authorisations and well approvals.

Australia

In Australian waters, the regulators are the National Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority and also the regions including Government of Western Australia, Department of Mines and Petroleum. Key Regulations include, but may not be limited to:

  • Petroleum (Submerged Lands) “Management of Safety on Offshore Facilities” Regulations 2007;
  • Petroleum (Submerged Lands) “Management of Well Operations” Regulations 2004.

The approach requires ‘good oil field practice’ supported by a Safety Case to ALARP, with independent verification.

Indonesia

In Indonesian waters, the regulator is effectively BP MIGAS and the requirements are usually set in

Production Sharing Contracts.

It is understood that the approach requires ‘best oilfield practice’.

 

Class Notations

The voluntary Environmental Class Notations CLEAN and CLEAN DESIGN encompass actual and future environmental regulations.

 

Class Notations

 

The voluntary Environmental Class Notations CLEAN and CLEAN DESIGN encompass actual and future environmental regulations.

 

Summary for DNV’s CLEAN and CLEAN DESIGN 

“Waste produced onboard vessels can seriously harm the marine environment, especially sea-living mammals, reptiles, birds and bottom-dwelling animals, and is extremely unsightly when littering beaches, tidal zones, mud-flats etc. It can also be harmful to shipping, especially smaller vessels. Handling and disposal of garbage is regulated by MARPOL Annex V.

Garbage is divided into six categories according to its constituent material and hazard potential. The various categories can be treated onboard, and can be disposed of at sea at various distances from nearest land. The exception is plastics, which under no circumstances can be dumped at sea. Various onboard treatment options include grinding, incineration, compaction, shredding, pulping and so on.

For CLEAN, the vessel must comply with MARPOL Annex V, and have in place a Garbage Management Procedure showing the various garbage treatment options onboard. The discharge criteria should also be explicitly expressed in the plan. Incinerators are not compulsory, but if installed they must be approved with respect to MEPC.76(40), Standard specification for shipboard incinerators, with amendments MEPC.93(45) Amendments to the standard specification for shipboard incinerators.

Regarding waste management, recycling of the garbage is considered as better sustainable practice than discharge overboard or incineration. Hence CLEAN DESIGN intention is to encourage and implement waste recycling onboard the vessel by separating recyclable and non-recyclable wastes onboard. Environmental awareness of crew with respect to minimizing generation of waste and separating of the waste is important in order to succeed in fulfilling the purpose of DNV Environmental class notation CLEAN DESIGN for garbage handling. It should be noted that disposal of garbage is allowed for vessels having CLEAN DESIGN notation in the condition of compliance with MARPOL Annex V discharge criteria. In all cases a Garbage Record book must be kept.

Food waste handling onboard a ship is an area CLEAN DESIGN requires additional requirements. Although larger food scraps may be discharged beyond 12 nautical miles according to MARPOL Annex V, but it is recommended that comminuters are used even outside this limit because they hasten assimilation into the marine environment. Ground food shall not be discharged into sewage treatment plant in order to be treated either by black or grey water. CLEAN DESIGN is requiring having a holding tank for ground food in order to be able to either deliver it to shore based facilities or temporary storage of it when vessel is below the discharge limit.

Passenger vessels with the Class Notation CLEAN DESIGN must store all garbage onboard prior to delivery on shore, or incinerate it. Only comminuted (ground) food waste can be disposed of at sea.

Please note that there might be local restrictions on the use of incinerators in some areas, like for instance the Baltic Sea where the use of incinerators is prohibited.”

*** Source: www.dnv.com

 

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